Home » RBSE Solutions Class 10 English Chapter 4 The Tale of the Bishnois

RBSE Solutions Class 10 English Chapter 4 The Tale of the Bishnois

In this article we have given RBSE Solutions for Class 10 English Literature Reader Prose Chapter 4 The Tale of the Bishnois are part of RBSE Solutions for Class 10 English.

Rajasthan Board RBSE Class 10 English Literature Prose Chapter 4 The Tale of the Bishnois

Activity 1: Comprehension
A. Tick the correct alternative:
1. Who was the mother of Jambaji?
(a) Hamsadevi
(b) Ramsadevi
(c) Amritadevi
(d) Kauslyadevi

2. What was the age of Jambaji when the great disaster overtook the Marwar?
(a) Twenty three
(b) Thirty five
(c) Twenty five
(d) Twenty one

3. How many Bishnois sacrificed their lives to guard their sacred heritage?
(a) 336
(b) 363
(c) 633
(d) 636
Answers.
1.(a),
2.(c),
3.(b),

Rajasthan Board

B. Say whether the following statements are true or false. Write T for true and F for false:
1. The Bhils resisted the encroachment made by hordes of cattle keepers from West and Central Asia.
2. The Rathore of Kanauj finally conquested the Bhils in 1451 AD.
3. Thakur Lohat was the father of Jambaji.
4. The land was not covered by Khejdi trees.
5. A copper plate was presented to the Bishnois by Diwan.
6. Rao Jodhaji was the ruler of Marwar in 1451 AD.
Answers.
1.-T,
2.-T,
3.-T,
4.-F,
5.-T,
6.-T

C. Answer the following questions in about 30 – 40 words each:

Question 1.
What kinds of animals and trees found in the desert of Marwar?

Answer.
The desert of Marwar was not a treeless waste of land and rocks. The land was covered by thousands of khejdi and plenty of ber and sangri trees. These trees were home to thousands of animals. There were plenty of antelopes, blackbucks, chinkaras and nilgais.

Question 2.
Who were the original residents of Marwar?

Answer.
The Bhils were the original residents of Marwar. About 3000 years ago, invading hordes of cattle keepers from west and central Asia entered Marwar. The Bhils resisted their advance. But the superior horses and weapons of the invaders forced the Bhils to retreat towards the Aravallis. Finally, the Rathores of Kanauj, in 13th AD, established their rule in Marwar.

Question 3.
How was the vegetation of Marwar affected?

Answer.
As the time passed, the large herds of cattle began to affect the vegetation. The seedings and saplings were grazed down by the cattle. They had little chance to grow into full-sized trees. Gradually, the growing population and the large herds of animals affected the vegetation of the region quite adversely.

Question 4.
Who conquered the Bhils finally and became the ruler of the whole Marwar?

Answer.
The Bhils were the original inhabitants of Marwar. Invading herds of cattle keepers from west and central Asia forced the Bhils to retreat to the Aravallis. Finally, in the thirteenth century, the Rathores of Kanauj invaded the Bhils and conquered them. The Rajputs now became the rulers of the whole of Marwar.

RBSE Solutions

Question 5.
What were the names of the parents of Jambaji?

Answer.
Jambaji was born in the year 1451 AD in the village of Pipasar in Marwar. His father was the headman of the village. His name was Thakur Lohat. The name of his mother was Hansadevi. The boy Jambaji was given the job of taking the animals out for grazing.

Question 6.
What was the most fascinating and enthralling thing for Jambaji?

Answer.
As a little boy, Jambaji was given the task of looking after his father’s large herd of cattle and sheep. For the little boy, it was great fun to take the animals out for grazing. Lying in the shade of a Khejdi tree, he would watch the herds of blackbucks. He was fascinated by the easy and graceful movements of antelopes. He thought that there was no sight more enthralling than a fight between two well-grown stags.

Question 7.
What were the two commandments of Jambaji’s message?

Answer.
Jambaji’s message included 29 basic tenets. However, two of the major commandments formed the crux of his message. The first commandment urged the followers never to cut down any green tree. The second one forbade the killing of any animals. This message of humanity and respect for all living things was accepted eagerly by this followers.

Question 8.
Why were Bishnois called by this name?

Answer.
The religious guru of Bishnois was Jambaji. His message included twenty nine basic tenets. Prohibition against the cutting down of any green tree or the killing of any animal were the main two commandments. The followers of Jambaji were called Bishnois. They were also called twenty-niners (bis = 20 and noi = 9). They were called so as they followed twenty-nine precepts laid down by Jambaji.

Question 9.
What was the use of lime kilns?

Answer.
The famous red sandstone of Jodhpur was found in the surrounding areas of Marwar. The red sandstone needed a lot of lime to treat it. Limestone could not be used in the rough form. It had to be cured. The limestone was cured in the lime kilns.

Rajasthan Solutions

Question 10.
Why did the Diwan send his men to Khejadali?

Answer.
The Diwan ordered that the lime kilns be started near Khejadali. The lime kilns needed a lot of fuel to operate them. When the workers got ready to cut the trees for fuel, Bishnois resisted them. It was against their religion to cut down any green tree. They would not let the workers touch the trees. The Diwan was enraged. He personally accompanied the workers on horseback to Khejadali village. He ordered the trees be cut.

Question 11.
What promise did Abhay Singh make to the Bishnois?

Answer.
Abhay Singh, the ruler of Jodhpur himself rode to Khejadali to mend matters. He assured thousands of weeping Bishnois that he would fully respect their religious principles. His promise was inscribed on a copper plate. The inscription assured that no green tree would be cut near any Bishnoi village. Nor would any animal be hunted in its vicinity.

Question 12.
What was written on the inscription presented to Bishnois?

Answer.
After the massacre of 363 Bishnois, the ruler of Jodhpur, Abhay Singh, mended matters. He arranged their wounded feeling by assuring them that he would fully respect their religious principles. A copper plate inscribed with this promise was presented to the Bishnois. The inscription promised that no green tree would ever be cut near any Bishnoi village. It was also inscribed that no animal would be hunted down in its vicinity.

D. Answer the following questions in about 60 – 80 words each:

Question 1.
What was the disaster Marwar faced when Jambaji was twenty five years old?

Answer.
When Jambaji was twenty-five years old, a great disaster over took the Marwar region. Marwar had already had small quantity of rain. But now the rain ceased altogether. A severe drought befell the region. The cattle were the worst sufferers. The second year was very bad. There was not a blade of grass left anywhere. People cut down trees to feed the animals with their leaves. The drought continued for eight consecutive years. When the stored grain was exhausted, people started eating khejdi pods and the flour of dried ber seeds. They hunted every one of the starving black bucks. Finally, they migrated to other places. Thousands of cattle died on the way.

Question 2.
How did Jambaji’s teachings affect the villagers?

Answer.
The disastrous drought made Jambaji think that man’s false pride destroyed the world around him. Jambaji realized that if life was to flourish again, he would have to live in a different way. He wanted the earth to be covered once again by plenty of khejdi, ber and sangri trees. He wanted herds of blackbucks to frolic again. In 1485, he began to preach a new message. His message included 29 basic tenets. The two major commandments urged the people never to cut down any green tree or kill any animal. Jambaji’s message of humanity impressed his followers and they eagerly accepted it.

RBSE Solutions

Question 3.
What did Bishnois sacrifice their lives for?

Answer.
Bishnois sacrificed their lives for a noble cause. Their religion very strongly prevented cutting down of any green tree. In 1730, the Maharaiah, Abhay Singh needed a lot of red sandstone for his new palace. Lime kilns needed a lot of fuel. Abhay Singh’s Diwan ordered his men to cut down trees for fuel near Khejadali. When the workers got ready to cut the trees for fuel, Bishnois would not let them touch the trees. Amritadevi, the wife of Bishnoi Ramkhod, sacrificed herself and her three daughters to save the trees from cutting down. Similarly, 363 Bishnois laid down their lives to guard their sacred heritage. The massacre moved Abhay Singh. He rode to Khejadali to mend matters. He assured Bishnois that he would fully respect their religious principles in future.

Question 4.
How did Bishnois save the trees?

Answer.
Bishnois are the followers of Jambaji. The two major commandments of Jambaji’s message were very important to them. The first commandment forbade the cutting down of any green tree. When the Dewan of Abhay Singh ordered his workers to cut down the trees around Khejadali village, Bishnois opposed them. They would not allow his men to touch the trees. Amritadevi, the wife of Bishnoi Ramkhod, was cut down along with her three daughters trying to save their trees. Similarly, 363 Bishnois laid down their lives. They didn’t allow the Diwan and his men to cut down the trees so long they were alive.

Question 5.
Why were Abhay Singh’s men

Answer.
The Diwan and his men massacred 363 Bishnois. They sacrificed their lives but didn’t allow the Diwan and his men to touch their trees. They came forward to hug the trees and be cut down with them. The Maharajah’s men had never imagined that things could take such a horrible turn. They were truly frightened. They rushed back to Jodhpur. They gave reports of the bloody massacre to Abhay Singh.

Question 6.
What made Abhay Singh visit Khejadali?

Answer.
Amritadevi, the wife of Bishnoi Ramkhod, and her three daughters were cut down with the trees and more of them came forward to hug the trees and to be cut down with them. When the news of the massacre reached Abhay Singh, the ruler of Jodhpur,he was moved by the courage and morality shown by the Bishnois. He personally rode to Khejadali to mend matters. He assured the people that from now on he would fully respect their religious principles. Cutting down of any green tree and killing of animals were banned around any Bishnoi village.

Question 7.
What do you learn by this tale? frightened?

Answer.
The tale of the Bishnois is a tale of courage, sacrifice and determination of Bishnois to save their ecological heritage. Bishnois could do anything even sacrifice their lives to save their religious heritage. The hot headed Diwan gave orders to his men to cut down trees around Khejadali village to fuel the lime kilns. A brave and determined community like that of the Bishnois understood the need of saving their trees. They wanted to stop Marwar being turned into a treeless waste of sand and rocks. Their principled stand made even the ruler of Jodhpur Abhay Singh bow down and accept their demands.

Rajasthan Board Solutions The Tale of the Bishnois

Question 8.
What impressions do you get from the action of the Diwan? What would you have done if you had been in place of Diwan?

Answer.
The cruel and hot-headed Diwan was intoxicated with power and authority. The action of the Diwan was revengeful. It ended in a bloody massacre. The Bishnois sacrificed their lives to save their religious and cultural heritage. The Diwan’s action was an act against humanity. It I had been in place of the Diwan, I would have respected their principled stand to save their ecological heritage.I would have found alternative sources to fuel the lime kilns. I would have never allowed such a bloody massacre.I would saved their trees as well as their lives.

Question 9.
How did Abhay Singh console the enraged Bishnois?

Answer.
The news of the bloody massacre reached Jodhpur. The ruler, Abhay Singh was moved by the high morals and the principled stand of the Bishnois. He himself rode to Khejadali village to mend matters. He assured the weeping and anguished Bishnois that he would respect their religious principles in future. Cutting down of any green tree and killing of animals would be banned around any Bishnoi village. He inscribed his promise on a copper plate and presented it to the Bishnois.

Question 10.
What message was inscribed on the copper plate?

Answer.
The bloody massacre moved Abhay Singh’s heart. He was highly impressed by the principled stand and high morals shown by the Bishnois. He himself rode to Khejadali village to assuage the feelings of the Bishnois.He presented a copper plate to them.The plate inscribed the message of the ruler. The message was very clear. It respected the religious principles of Bishnois. It banned cutting down of any green tree or killing of animals in the vicinity of any Bishnoi village.

RBSE Solutions

A. Write one word beginning with the letter given, for the group of words put in bracket. The first one is done for you as an example.

1. Marwar is a treeless waste of sand and rocks. (land with very few plants or animals)
2. A camel can enjoy a midday s………. in the shade of babul tree. (rest or sleep in the early afternoon)
3. The cattle were the worst sufferers in the first year of d………. . (dry or no rainfall at all)
4. Jambaji wanted the region to be covered again by an a………. of Khejdi, Ber, Ker etc. (in sufficient quantity)
5. Shelly and Keats were c………. poets. (belonging to the same period)
6. Abhay Singh wanted to construct a beautiful p………. for himself. (official home of kings)
7. We should pay due regards to our a………. from time to time. (forefathers who lived a long time ago)
8. Bishnois celebrate the memory of their m………. by planting more and more trees. (persons killed because of beliefs)
Answer.
2. siesta,
3. drought,
4. abundance,
5. contemporary,
6. palace,
7. ancestors,
8. martyrs

Rajasthan Board Solutions

Activity 3: Grammar

Active and Passive Voice
Look at the following sentences:
(i) King Abhay Singh presented a copper plate to the Bishnois.
(ii) A copper plate was presented to the Bishnois by King Abhay Singh.
In the first sentence the subject of the verb acts, so the verb is said to be in

Active voice. The Tale of the Bishnois
In the second sentence the subject of the verb is acted upon, therefore the verb is said to be in Passive Voice. It is the verb that is expressed in the active or in he passive voice.

When do we use the passive voice?
(i) When we are more interested in the action than the doer of that action: e.g. The bank was looted yesterday. (The thieves looted the bank yesterday.) The burglar was caught in the house. (The house owner caught the burglar.)
(ii) When we don’t know the doer of action or when he/she can’t be mentioned. e.g. The gate was opened. (Somebody opened the gate.) Five terrorists were killed in Kashmir. (The army killed five terrorists in Kashmir.)

There are certain rules to be followed when the verb of active voice is changed into passive voice.
(i) The object of the verb in active voice becomes the subject of passive voice.
Sita sings songs.
Songs are sung by Sita.
(ii) Usually transitive verbs are passive voiced, but some intransitive verbs become transitive when a preposition is added to them and they can be passive voiced:
He aimed at a lion.
A lion was aimed at by him.
(iii) When the verb in active voice has two objects (i.e. direct and indirect) either of them can be made subject in passive voice:
She gave me a gift.
I was given a gift by her.
A gift was given to me by her.
(iv) We use ‘let’ while changing imperative sentences of active voice into passive voice. The construction of the sentence in passive voice will be as under:
Let + object + be + Past Participle.
E.g. open the door.
Let the door be opened.
Please sit down.
You are requested to sit down.
If the imperative sentence is negative
Let + object + not + be + past participle.
Don’t shut it.
Let it not be shut.
(v) Interrogative sentences in active voice are changed thus:
(a) Who found this box?
By whom was this box found?
(b) Why do you study English?
Why is English studied by you?
(c) Have you finished your homework?
Has your homework been finished by you?
(d) Do you like him?
Is he liked by you?
(vi) If there is to infinitive in active voice,
it is changed into perfect infinitive to form the sentence in passive voice:
It is time to leave the school.
It is time for the school to be left.
Or It is time to shut the mall.
It is time for the mall to be shut.
(vii) Sentences having, modal auxiliaries in active voice are changed into passive voice thus:

Exercise Rajasthan board Solutions The Tale of the Bishnois

A. Change the following sentences into passive voice. Omit the agent.
1. Somebody had put out the light.
2. People serve ice-cream with meal.
3. They are expecting good news.
4. They admire the bravery of the Indian soldiers.
5. The Principal has dissolved the committee.
6. The Election commission announces elections for the state assemblies.
7. People hold honesty as the best policy.
Answer.
1. The light had been put out.
2. Ice-cream is served with the meal.
3. Good news is being expected.
4. The bravery of the Indian soldiers is admired.
5. The committee has been dissolved.
6. Elections for the state assemblies are announced.
7. Honesty is held as the best policy.

B. Convert the following sentences into passive form:

1. The teacher has appointed him monitor.
2. I opened the door.
3. He can lift the box.
4. Why do you suspect me?
5. Are they offering him a chair?
6. Whom do we like most?
7. Who wrote Macbeth?
8. Put him this question.
9. Show him the way.
10. Don’t tease her.
11. Give him a suitable reply.
12. Has someone informed the police?
13. Everyone believed that the movement was a failure.
14. People think that the government is working well.
Answer.
1. He has been appointed monitor by the teacher.
2. The door is was opened by me.
3. The box can be lifted by him.
4. Why an I suspected by you?
5. Is he being offered a chair by them?
6. Who is liked most by you?
7. By whom was Macbeth written?
8. Let this question be put to him.
9. Let the way be shown to him.
10. Let she not be teased.
11. Let a suitable reply be given to him.
12. Has the police be informed?
13. It was believed that the movement was a failure.
14. It is thought that the government is working well.

RBSE Solutions

C. Convert the following sentences from Passive to Active Voice:

1. Khejdi trees are not allowed to be cut in Rajasthan.
2. The green cover of the Indian sub continent has been ravaged by grazing animals.
3. Bishnois were not to be cowed.
4. Jambhaji’s followers were called Bishnois.
5. The door was painted green by him.
6. By whom is English taught to you?
7. He was given the task of looking after his puppy.
Anwers.
1. They don’t allow khejdi trees to be cut in Rajasthan.
Or
Rajasthan doesn’t allow Khejdi trees to be cut.
2. Grazing animals have ravaged the green cover of the Indian sub-continent.
3. The could not cow the Bishnois.
4. They called Jambhaji’s followers Bishnois.
5. He painted the door green.
6. Who teaches you English?
7. They have given him the task of looking after his puppy.

Activity 4: Speech Activity

Divide the whole class into four to six groups/pairs. Each group will discuss the contribution of Bishnois to protect the ecology of desert amongst them and then each team leader would present their views before the whole class.
Answers.
Group A: Bishnois contributed a lot to protect the ecology of the desert.
Group B: No doubt about it. It was made possible by their religious leader Jambaji.
Group C: Who was Jambaji?
Group D. Jambaji was born in 1451 AD during the reign of Rao Jodhaji.
Group A: What was so great about Jambaji?
Group B: When Jambaji was twenty-five years old, a great disaster overtook the region.
Group C: A terrible drought overtook the region.
Group D: People cut down all the trees and hunted down all animals.
Group A: In the end, people migrated to other areas and thousands of cattle perished on the way.
Group B: Dying animals and starving children moved Jambaji.
Group C: He realised that pride and selfishness of man were destroying the world around him.
Group C: Jambaji wanted the earth to be covered again by khejdi, ber, ker and sangri trees.
Group D. Jambaji’s message included twenty-nine tenets. His two major commandments were a prohibition against the cutting down of any green tree or the killing of any animal.
Group A: Jambaji’s followers were called Bishnois or twenty niners.
Group B: The preserved the trees around their villages and protected black bucks and all other birds and animals.
Group C: Gradually their territory became covered by trees and the Bishnois became a prosperous people.
Group D. In 1730, they defied Maharajah Abhay Singh’s order and didn’t allow his men to cut trees in their village.
Group A: 363 Bishnois laid down their lives to save their khejdi trees.
Group B: A few years ago they planted 363 trees to honour their 363 martyrs.
Group C: In this way, Bishnois laid down even their lives to protect the ecology of the desert.
Group D: Even today, Bishnois follow the message of their religious leader, Jambaji, not to cut trees and kill blackbucks and other birds and animals.

Activity 5: Composition The Tale of the Bishnois

Question 1.
Write a paragraph in about 150 words on ‘Trees are essential for our life’.

Answer.
Can we imagine the kind of life on the planet earth without trees and forests? Trees, forests and green belts are lungs and life-lines of the environment. Trees and forests help to maintain ecology and the environment of the world. They bring rain. All the green belts and great forests of the world have heavy rainfall. Those parts where there is no greenery and forests have turned into deserts. The Sahara, and the Thar turned into deserts due to lack of greenery and forests. Trees help a lot to avoid soil erosion. Trees keep the soil intact. They are essential for our life. They give out oxygen, so necessary for life. They have been providing fruits and fuel for the tribals. It is so sad that slowly but surely this world is inching towards becoming a vast treeless and barren desert. If we want to avoid it,we should grow more and more trees.

Rajasthan Board Solutions

Question 2.
Write a short paragraph on Importance of animals’.

Answer.
We can’t imagine this beautiful world without trees and animals. Both are interconnected. Animals can survive only if they have forests to live in. No trees and no forest will also mean having no animals. Human beings have had very old and long association with animals. Domesticated animals like cows, bulls, goats, camels, horses have been extensively used for agricultural needs and for getting milk and meat. Pets like dogs have found entry in the world of men. Their wool and furs protect us from cold while their leather is used for making foot wears. Man should realize the importance of animals. He should treat them kindly without resorting to cruelty and indifference.

The Tale of the Bishnois Additional Questions and Answers

A. Answer the following questions in about 30-40 words each:
Question 1.
What is so incredible to see amidst a treeless waste in today’s Marwar?

Answer.
What is today’s Marwar? It is nothing more than a waste of sand and rocks.Nothing big can grow here. The only things that grow there are the thorny shrubs, a few tufts of short grass. Occasionally we can see stunted ber and babul trees. However, we are pleasantly surprised to see groves of well grown khejdi trees. We can see such trees only around a Bishnoi village in the desert.

Question 2.
Why is the khejdi called a kalpavriksha?

Answer.
A khejdi tree is the life-line of the Marwar desert. It is a kind of tree that fulfills all wishes. It is a cousin of the babul tree. It is rightly called the ‘kalpavriksha’. A full grown camel can enjoy a midday short sleep in its shade. Its leaves nourishes goats, sheep, cattle and camels. Its pods can be made into a delicious curry. Even its thorn’s guard and the farmers fields against invadin

Question 3.
Describe Marwar before it had not yet been conquered by the desert.

Answer.
There was a time when the vast territory of Mewar had not turned itself into a treeless desert of sand and rocks. Of course, the climate was the same as it is today. The land was covered with thousand upon thousands of Khejdi trees. There were a large number of ber, ker and sangri trees. Once these plains were home to thousands of antelopes, blackbucks, chinkaras and nilgais. On this bounty lived the original inhabitants of Mewar, the Bhils.

Question 4.
How did the large herds of cattle begin to affect the vegetation of Marwar?

Answer.
As centuries passed, the number of animals increased beyond the means to sustain them. The large herds of cattle began to affect the fragile vegetation of Marwar. The cattle grazed down the seedlings and saplings. They had little chance of growing into well-grown trees. This affected the vegetation. Animals and the Bhils found it difficult to sustain themselves.

Question 5.
How did Marwar pass through different rulers and races?

Answer.
The Bhils were the original tribal people that inhabited Marwar in the olden times. At three thousand years ago, hordes of ‘cattle keepers’ poured into Marwar from West and Central Asia. The Bhils resisted them. Superior weapons and horses of the invaders overpowered the Bhils. They were made to retreat towards the Aravallis. Finally, the Rathors of Kanauj conquered the Bhils in 13th century AD.

Question 6.
Describe the birth of Jambaji and his childhood.

Answer.
In 1451 AD, an extraordinary child was born in the village of Pipasar. His father Thakur Lohat was the headman of the village. His mother was Hamsadevi.The boy was called Jambaji. As a little boy, he was given the task of looking after his father’s large herd of cattle and sheep. He enjoyed the fight between two well grown stags.

RBSE Solutions

Question 7.
When did the disaster overtake the whole region? How long the animals suffered during the drought?

Answer.
Jambaji was 25 years old when the whole region was ravaged by a severe drought. There were no rains at all. In the first year the animals were fed on the bajra straw stored in the houses. The second year was even worse the animals were fed on tree-leaves. Even then the animals died of hunger. The drought continued for eight long years.

Question 8.
Describe the misery of the people during the disastrous drought. How were they forced to migrate in masses?

Answer.
All branches and leaves of trees were cut down and they began to dry up. The stored grain was exhausted.People ate khejdi pods and the flour of dried ber seeds. After that they tore the bark off sangri trees, powdered and cooked it. All blackbucks were hunted down. In the end, the people lost all hopes and migrated in masses.

Question 9.
How did the disastrous drought haunt Jambaji day and night?

Answer.
Jambaji was haunted by the disastrous drought day and night. It had continued for eight long years. He could see sufferings all around him. He had spent many sleepless nights. The dying cattle and the starving children haunted him day and night.

for more RBSE Solutions follow on (Google News) and share with your friends.