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MP Board Class 12th English A Voyage Chapter 18 The Abominable Snowman Solutions

In this article we provided you MP Board Class 12th English A Voyage Solutions Chapter 18 The Abominable Snowman (Major Harold William) with Important Questions Answers.

The Abominable Snowman Textbook Exercises

Word Power

A. Fill in the blanks with the words given below: .
(tracks, lunatic, outlaws, forestalled, sarcasm, affirm, trivial, inconceivable, delicious,
trodden)

1. The police are looking for a band of who are involved in yesterday’s bank robbery.
2. Bank robbery is not a offence.
3. The expedition took us to places where no one had before.
4. The police reached the culprits by following the left by their car in the mud.
5. He wanted to retire early but hisplan was by unforeseen events.
6. The food at the restaurant we visited last night was
7. He praised me for my efforts but there was a hint of in his praise.
8. She worked hard but still failed. It was
9. The police charged the man of theft but he continued to that he was innocent.
10. The man was mentally ill. They said he was a

Answer:

  1. outlaws
  2. trivial
  3. trodden
  4. tracks
  5. forestalled
  6. delicious
  7. sarcasm
  8. inconceivable
  9. affirm
  10. lunatic.

The Abominable Snowman Comprehension

A. Complete the following sentences choosing the correct alternatives:

Question 1.
When his porters said that the tracks were made by the wild man, Colonel Howard Bury
(a) believed it
(b) ignored it
(c) took cognizance of it
(d) mocked at it.
Answer:
(d) mocked at it.

Question 2.
When scientists rejected the idea of the footprints as those of monkeys, people said that they may be those of
(a) Cinderella
(b) an ascetic
(c) Giant Panda or Snow Bear
(d) langue monkeys.
Answer:
(c) Giant Panda or Snow Bear

Question 3.
Mr. Smythe sighted the tracks in
(a) Garhwal
(b) Sikkim
(c) Lapkha la
(d) Zemu Gap.
Answer:
(a) Garhwal

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Question 4.
The first European who had seen the Snowman was
(a) Dr. Odell
(b) Mr. Tombazi
(c) Mr. Tilman
(d) Mr. Smythe.
Answer:
(a) Dr. Odell

Question 5.
Mr. Tilman concludes that we must believe that the tracks were made by the , Abominable Snowman until……………….
(a) sighting of the tracks is stopped
(b) proofs about better claimant are found
(c) more traeks are found
(d) the Snowman is photographed
Answer:
(b) proofs about better claimant are found

B. Answer the following questions in one sentence each:

Question 1.
What did the first Mount Everest party come across on the mountains?
Answer:
The first Mount Everest party came across the footprints closely resembling those of human being on the mountain.

Question 2.
Why did the author put three exclamation marks after the statement in his dispatch?
Answer:
The author put three exclamation marks after the statement in his dispatch because it was ridiculous for him.

Question 3.
What was Mr. Newman’s theory about the footprints?
Answer:
Newman’s theory about the footprints was that they belonged either to the outlaws or to the ascetics.

Question 4.
Why could the footprints not be those of Langur monkeys?
Ans.
The footprints could not be those of Langur monkeys because he didn’t find or hear about monkeys there.

Question 5.
How did Mr. Smythe react when the zoologist’s verdict came out?
Answer:
Mr. Smythe reacted after the zoologist’s verdict came out by. calling their theory a nonsense.

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Question 6.
What did the author inquire about on reaching Darjeeling?
Answer:
The author inquired about the lunatic on reaching Darjeeling.

Question 7.
What was the author’s theory about the shape of the footprints? (M.P Board 2015)

Answer:
The author saw footprints resembling large boots and similar in shape to those of man about six or seven inch long.

Question 8.
What type of footprints of the Snowman did Mr. Tombazi find?
Answer:
They were similar in shape to those of man but only six or seven inches long.

Question 9.
What could Mr. Tombazi assert with certainty?
Answer:
Mr. Tombazi could assert with certainty that the silhouette of the mysterious being was – identical with the outline of a human figure.

Question 10.
What does the author affirm at the end?
Answer:
The author at the end affirms that tracks for which no adequate explanation is forthcoming, have been seen and will no doubt continue to be seen in the Himalayas and until the better claimant is found. We may as well attribute them to their rightful owner, The Abominable Snowman.

C. Answer the following questions in about 60 words each:

Question 1.
What analogy has the author used for proving the existence of the Snowman? (M.P. Board 2016)

Answer:
In this article, the author makes an effort to unfold the mystery of the Abominable Snowman who has long been undiscovered with authenticity. He takes the footprints as evidence of the existence of Snowman. The analogy that he takes to prove it is that if fingerprints can decide the hanging of a man, why cannot footprints establish the existence of one.

Question 2.
How did the author justify his contribution to the sum of knowledge about the Abominable Snowman?

Answer:
The author were able to justify the contribution to the sum of knowledge about the Abominable Snowman because he had studied the views and findings of all his predecessors who had escaped many a facts. The author with the help of the Sherpas had collected practical views.

Question 3.
Why did the author want to start his inquiry with the Mount Everest?

Answer:
The author wanted to start his inquiry with Mount Everest because it is still untrodden and has been mysterious, for long strange things happen there.

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Question 4.
More evidence was provided by two persons about the existence of the Snowman in 1936. What was it and who were they?

Answer:
In 1936, one Mr. Ronald Kaulback travelled in the Upper Salween and reported having seen at 16,000 feet five sets.of tracks, taking exactly as though made by a bare-footed man. He added that there were no bears. More evidence was tendered by Wing Commander Beauman who reported similar tracks from the Central Himalayas.

Question 5.
How did Mr. Kaulback react when people suggested that the footprints could be those of the Giant Panda or Snow Bear?

Answer:
When Mr. Kaulback said that the tracks which he saw were exactly made by biped, he was contradicted with the view that they were made by the Giant Panda or Snow Bear. At this, he reacted that he was ashamed that he had not thought of it himself but he had not heard of Pandas in those parts nor were there bamboo shoots.

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Question 6.
What does the author mean by “the season of 1937 was an active one in the Himalayas”?

Answer:
The author means to say that in this season a number of efforts were made to find out the facts behind the footprints. A combined authority of ‘The Times’ and ‘Mr. Smythe’ gave a theory of the extinction of those species but the two correspondents were not ready to support it and they gave another views.

Question 7.
How did Mr. Tombazi happen to see the Snowman?

Answer:
Mr. Tombazi writes that “an intense glare prevented him seeing anything for the first few seconds, but soon he spotted the object referred to, two or three yards away down the valley. It was exactly like human beings walking upright and wore no clothing.

Question 8.
Why did the author compare Mr. Tombazi with the old Lady at the Zoo?

Answer:
The author compared Mr. Tombazi with the old lady at the zoo because Tombazi had witnessed the existence of Snowman still he didn’t accept it with great certainty. He was still confused.

D. Answer the following questions in about 75-100 words each:

Question 1.
Do you think that Sherlock Holmes’ Monograph and Darwin’s Treatise were important
contributions to the sum of knowledge? Justify your answer.

Answer:
The author has a broad view. It is true that science explores a new fact on the basis of speculation. Science welcomes specialisation. Speculation gives birth to new ideas. When one works on those ideas one can formulate new achievement. For example/one can say had Newton not thought over the fact, why the apple fell down to earth, he had not been given to such a great discovery because falling of an apple was not the first incident. Many people almost all might have seen falling of an apple from a tree. In the same way, gherlock Holmes Monograph and Darwin’s Treatise were important contributions to the sum of knowledge.

Question 2.
How did Mr. Smythe strengthen his claim that the footprints were those of a ‘biped’? Why did he later retract his claim and say that the tracks were made by a bear?

Answer:
Mr. Smythe was an explorer in the Himalayas. He found the evidences of the footprints. They were huge, apparently of a biped. Photographs and measurements were taken. Then in order to clinch the thing he got the Sherpa’s signatures on a written statement to the effect that the tracks were those of a Metch Kangami.

They added that although they had never seen one, because anyone who does, dies or is killed, they had seen pictures of his tracks in Tibetan monasteries. Later, when Smythe submitted his evidence, that retreated his claim, and said that the tracks were made by a bear. He did so because he was not sure about the Sherpas who were frightened men and could withdraw at any moment. More than that, there was no way to measure and prove the tracks and print.

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Question 3.
Describe H.W. Tilman’s sighting of tracks in Sikkim.
Answer:
The author, H.W. Tillman, had an open mind on the subject. In 1938, during the course of his exploration, he was in Sikkim when he saw tracks. Along with two Sherpas, he was crossing the Zemu Gap, a 19,000 feet pass between Kanchenjimga and Simbu. The weather was thick, the snow soft, and they plodded up a long, easy snow slope, and they saw by their side a single line of footsteps. In view of the prevailing weather, it could not be of many days old. Both the Sherpas and Tillman had been forestalled in the crossing of the Gap and when they gained the col they craned their neck over the other side which was extremely steep, to see which line that solitary climber had taken. The tracks having reached the col, had disappeared on some rocks on the Simvu side.

Question 4.
How did the author confirm that the tracks that he had observed were not made by human beings?

Answer:
The author was trying to get to a conclusion about the identity of the track he had seen. When he reached Darjeeling, he knew that no party had gone on the mountains recently. The last visit was made by Brigadier John Hunt but even Mr. Hunt had been there in November. So, it got confirmed that the tracks were not made by the human beings.

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Question 5.
What reasons does the author ascribe to the round shape of the footprints?
Answer:
The tracks seen by the two previous witnesses were circular while those seen by Hunt and the author himself resembled those made by large boots. The author concluded that they were not necessarily of a brute beast, but an erect thing who might have come down from his tree even earlier than they did. He thinks that even beavers, bees, ants, birds are not without constructive ability therefore those tracks could be attributed to a Snowman.

Question 6.
Describe in your own words the sight ML Tombazi witnessed when he was called
from his tent by his porters?

Answer:
Mr. Tombazi, having been called from his tent, saw an intense glare which prevented his seeing for the first few seconds. However soon, he could spot the object two or three hundred yards away down the valley. The figure, no doubt, in outline was exactly like a human being, walking upright, and stopping occasionally to uproot some dwarf rhododendron. It showed dark against the snow and wore no clothing. Within the next minute or so it had moved into some thick scrub and disappeared. He examined the
footprints, which were similar in shape to those of a man but only six or seven inches long.

The Abominable Snowman Grammar

A. Look at the sentences below:
Now complete the following sentences in which only if (when) clauses have been given:
If finger prints can hang a man I see no reason why foot prints should not establish the existence of one. We can say the same thing in this way also.

If fingerprints can hang a man, why should footprints not establish the existence of one? In such sentences ‘if’ can be replaced bis, when and they are not conditional sentences:

1. If you can go there why ……
2. If the gate is locked how ……
3. If they don’t let you in what ……
4. If you don’t know the answer why ……
5. If you lose your way in the forest what ……
6. If you are nervous at this stage how ……
7. If there is a storm tonight what ……
8. If you are asked to choose one of them which one ……
9. What if they.don’t come on time?……
10. What if you don’t pay the bill? ……

Answer:

  1. would they not welcome you.
  2. would one enter the campus.
  3. would you do to them.
  4. wouldn’t you ask your teacher.
  5. would you do.
  6. would you succeed.
  7. would we do to face it.
  8. would you like.
  9. would you do.
  10. would they do.

B. Look at the following sentence again:

Nearly all the evidence I have collected on behalf of his existence consists of footprints, but if fingerprints can hang a man I see no reason why footprints should not establish the existence of one.  The sentence has the following clauses:

  • nearly all the evidence consists Of footprints.
  • I have collected on behalf of his existence.
  • but if fingerprints can hang a man.
  • I see no reason.
  • why footprints should not establish the existence of one.

There are several sentences of such type in the lesson. As shown above find out the clauses in the following sentences:

Question 1.
It is fitting that the starting point of our journey should be Mount Everest a mountain whose summit is still untrodden, which was for long itself mysterious, and upon which strange things have happened.
Answer:
The clauses in these sentences are given below:

  • It is fitting.
  • that the starting point of our journey should be Mount Everest—a mountain.
  • whose summit is still untrodden.
  • which was for long itself mysterious.
  • and upon which strange things have happened.

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Question 2.
Large langur monkeys were suggested, to which Mr. Kaulback replied that he had neither seen nor heat’d of any monkeys there and that the tracks were 3,000 feet above’the tree line.
Answer:

  • Large langur monkeys were suggested.
  • to which Mr. Kaulback replied.
  • that he had neither seen nor heard of any monkeys there.
  • and that the tracks were 3,000 feet above the tree line.

Question 3.
The suggestion was considered a shrewd one and Mr. Kaulback wrote to say he was ashamed he had not thought of it himself.
Answer:

  • The suggestion was considered a shrewd one.
  • and Mr. Kaulback wrote to say.
  • he was ashamed.
  • he had not thought of it himself.

Question 4.
But may be there was a hint of sarcasm, for he added that he had never heard of pandas in those parts nor were there any bamboo shootsa sine qua non for pandas, without which they languish and die.
Answer:

  • But may be there was a hint of sarcasm.
  • for he added.
  • that he had never heard of pandas in those parts nor were there any bamboo shootsa sine qua non for pandas.
  • without which they languish and die.

Question 5.
They added that although they had never seen one, because anyone who does, dies or is killed, they had seen pictures of his tracks in Tibetan monasteries.
Answer:

  • They added.
  • that although they had never seen one.
  • because anyone who does, dies or is killed.
  • they had seen pictures of his tracks in Tibetan monasteries.

Speaking Activity

A. Divide the class into two groups. Arrange a debate whether ‘the Snowman’ exists or not. One group – will speak in favour of’its’existence and the other will speak against it.
Answer:
Do it yourself.

Writing Activity

A. Write an essay in about 250 words on “Mountaineering in the Himalayas” on the bas is of the following points:

  • Why people prefer the Himalayas for mountaineering.
  • Precautions to be taken before setting out.
  • Help of local sherpas.
  • Precautions during climbing.
  • Good and bad effects of mountaineering on the local population and the eco-system.

Answer:
Mountaineering is an adventurous activity that one undertakes to explore mysteries underlying in regions of high mountains. People prefer the Himalayas for mountaineering because it is full of mysteries of the widest ranges. It is the largest region to explore. People have been trying to unrave its regions but there is still a lot more to do.

Before undertaking a climb to a mountain, one must be careful and aware of the impending dangers. One must study well the regions that one opts for. All the necessary equipment must be arranged. One must know the direction, height, curves, etc. of the regions.

The local Sherpas are of much help for a mountaineer. They know all the facts of the regions. They can lead one to particular direction. They can provide all sorts of local help if one falls in danger. During mountaineering, one must be particular about the team and tools, oxygen, food and direction. One should be helpful to each other.

Mountaineering provides livelihood to local people. They get new access to jobs. They can flourish their business. However in some respect, mountaineering affects the local eco-system due to the rush of people from outside regions. They change the face of the natural life of the people.

Think It Over

Mystery shrouds the existence of ‘the Abominable Snowtnan’. Think about the ways of solving this mystery.
Answer:
Do it yourself.

Things to Do

Collect material that you can find on ‘Abominable Snowman or ‘Yeti’ (as he is called in Hindi) and Unidentified Flying Objects (U.F.O.) and exhibit it in the classroom.
Answer:
Do it yourself.

The Abominable Snowman Passages for Comprehension

Read the following passages and answer the questions that follow:

In 1921, Colonel Howard Bury, leader of the first Mount Everest party came upon footprints closely resembling those of a human being on the Lakhpa La, a 22,000-foot pass, north-east of the mountain. In a dispatch telegraphed home he mentioned this and also the belief of his porters that the tracks were made by the Wild Men of the Snows. In order to show his opinion of such a laughable idea, he put no fewer than three exclamation marks after the statement, but in spite of this news was accorded its full value, and Colonel Howard Bury learnt, no doubt, how hard it is to be funny by telegraph. (Page 135)

Questions:
(i) Who was Col. Howard Bury? What did he see in the Mountain?
(ii) Find the word opposite in meaning to ‘distantly’.
(iii) Give the noun form of the word ‘resembling’.
(iv) Give a word similar in meaning to ‘identical’.

Answers:
(i) Col. Howard Bury was the leader of the first Mount Everest party in 1921. He saw footprints closely resembling those of human beings in mountain.
(ii) ‘Closely’ is the word opposite to ‘distantly’.
(iii) ‘Resemblance’ is the noun form of ‘resembling’.
(iv) ‘Resembling’ is similar in meaning to ‘identical’.

2. Intense glare prevented my seeing anything for the first few seconds, but I soon spotted the object referred to. two or three hundred yards away down the valle Unquestionably the figure in outline was exactly like a humati being, walking upright and stooping occasionally to uproot some dwarf rhododendron. It showed dark against the snow and wore no clothing. Within the next minute or so It had moved into some thick scrub and disappeared. I examined the footprints which were similar in shape to those of a man but only 6 or 7 inches long. Marks of five toes and instep were clear but trace of heel indistinct. The prints were undoubtedly those of a biped. (Page 138)

Questions:
(i) What did he see in the pass? What did they look alike?
(ii) Find a word similar in meaning to ‘vanished’.
(iii) Make the noun form of ‘prevented’.
(iv) Give the opposite of ‘indistinct’.

Answers:
(i) He saw an object with intense light, resembling a human being.
(ii) ‘Disappeared’ has a similar meaning to ‘vanished’. .
(iii) ‘Prevention’ is the noun form of ‘prevented’.
(iv) ‘Distiict’ is the opposite of ‘indistinct’.

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3. Chesterton has remarked on the loving care and skill bestowed by them on building up Pithecarithropus a bit of skull here, a few teeth there, and a thigh bone from somewhere else until at last they produce a detailed drawing carefully shaded to show that the very hairs of his head were numbered. I am at a loss to express a definite opinion. I merely affirm that tracks for which no adequate explanation is forthcoming have been seen and will, no doubt, continue to be seen in the Himalayas, and until the better claimant is found we may as well attribute them to their rightful owner, the Abominable Snowman.  (Page 139)

Questions:
(i) What does the author conclude?
(ii) Give a word similar in meaning to ‘elaborated’.
(iii) Give the adverb form of ‘adequate’.
(iv) Give a word opposite in meaning to ‘inadequate’.

Answers:
(i) The author concludes to attribute the footprints to the Abominable Snowman until
the better claimant is found.
(ii) Detailed is a word similar in meaning to ‘elaborated’.
(iii) The adverb form of ‘adequate’ is ‘adequately’.
(iv) A word opposite in meaning to ‘inadequate’ is ‘adequate’.

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